How EU GDPR Affects Collection of Biometric and Genetic Data

As we look toward the new European Union General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) which takes effect this week, we expect some of its provisions to affect U.S-based life sciences companies conducting clinical trials at EU sites, particularly related to the collection of genetic and biometric data.

GDPR governs how data controllers and processors are permitted to engage with the personal data of EU citizens.  The new legislation differs from the former controlling legislation, the Data Protection Act, in some key ways. GDPR is broader in scope than the previous directive meaning that, as of May 25, 2018, even non-EU based companies will be subject to more extensive regulation.

GDPR implements a new extra-territorial rule, so that no matter if a company is based in the EU or not, it is still bound by GDPR if certain criteria are met. For example, even if a data controller (i.e., a sponsor) or processor is not established in EU, they will be bound by GDPR if they’re processing the data of individuals within the EU. Sponsors in the U.S. may now find themselves obligated by the GDPR privacy protections where they were not bound before. Member States are also free to impose further restrictions on the processing of health-related data.

The life sciences industry and clinical studies are clearly reliant upon the data that are collected from participants within clinical trials. GDPR introduces new, explicit privacy protections for such health-related data.

GDPR specifically categorizes genetic and biometric data—which is the type of health data upon which clinical trials largely rely—as “sensitive personal data”. Under GDPR, the processing of genetic or biometric data is prohibited unless an exception applies. In the clinical trials context, an exception that might commonly apply is gaining the consent of the data subject.

In an effort to protect the interests of individuals where an imbalance of power could occur or the possibility of serious data protection risks exist, GDPR has heightened the standard of consent to mean “any freely given, specific, informed and unambiguous indication of the data subject’s wishes by which he or she, by a statement or clear affirmative action, signifies agreement to the processing of personal data related to him or her.”

This definition will provide the framework for sponsors gaining the necessary explicit consent from individuals who are considering joining a clinical study, such as via a written statement or informed consent contract.

As we approach May 25, 2018, sponsors must ensure that all informed consent contracts are compliant with GDPR and meet explicit consent standards as well as all other contractual obligations so that all prospective participants are protected and the sponsor is in compliance.

Contracts Associates has been working to help our clients navigate this new regulatory framework. Our team of attorneys has the deep experience and expertise necessary ensure that all of your informed consent agreements meet the higher bar that GDPR has introduced. We help our clients minimize the risk of penalties by updating contracts and providing reviews to ensure that all informed consent language is GDPR-compliant. If you haven’t yet contemplated how GDPR might change affect your study, please contact our CEO, Colleen Sproul, at cms@contractsassociates.com or call 781-598-8000 so that we can help guide you.

House Passes “Right to Try” bill – Compromising Public Health and Drug Development

On March 21, only one week after an initial defeat in the U.S. House, the controversial “Right to Try” bill was passed by a vote of 267-149. The legislation is now on its way to the U.S. Senate.

“Right to Try” would provide access to experimental therapies to patients with life-threatening illnesses while weakening FDA oversight and compromising public health and medical research. The FDA already offers patients access to experimental drugs or medical devices outside of clinical trials via the Expanded Access (sometimes called Compassionate Care) program and approves the overwhelming majority of all applications received—about 99%. Under Expanded Access, the FDA continues to supervise administration of the experimental drugs which both helps reduce individual patient risk and works to improve overall public health outcomes.

The current “Right to Try” bill permits patients and their doctors to bypass the FDA and work directly with pharmaceutical companies for access to drugs which have merely completed Phase I clinical trials. Some patient groups argue that by cutting out FDA oversight and creating an alternative avenue for accessing experimental drugs, Right to Try actually increases patient risks and is demonstrably less safe than Expanded Access.

Over 75 patient groups sent a letter to the House opposing passage of the bill, citing the dangers it presented to patients such as the seven-day lagtime between patient access to the investigational therapies and FDA notification of any possible side effects or negative outcomes. Additionally, the patient groups cited the removal of FDA-sanctioned dosing and safety measures. They also cited shortcomings of the bill such as its failure to address significant barriers to patients such as access and cost.

The bill strips patients of potential legal remedies by protecting doctors and drug companies from liability in the case of negative outcomes for patients.

The legislation is also poised to compromise medical research and drug development by preventing the FDA from using any data from negative clinical outcomes in its drug-approval assessments. Barring FDA from using such data would shroud the successes or failures of the experimental drugs in obscurity—possibly preventing further large-scale advances in overall research and development.

Ultimately, “Right to Try” strips the FDA of established regulatory authority and protections, increases risk to patients, and obfuscates data and outcomes vital to continued success in research and development–all of which could result in serious, wide-ranging public health issues.

We at Contracts Associates will continue to monitor this important issue.

More Clinical Trials in China in the Future?

The China Food and Drug Administration (CFDA), which became a regulatory member of the International Council for Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH) in June 2017, is now moving forward with the implementation of several ICH guidelines in order to further the development of innovative drugs and devices in China, and align with global regulatory standards in manufacturing and development.

China’s implementation of the ICH guidelines will not only help ensure that global standards of quality and safety are met but can help reduce drag on pharmaceutical companies’ timelines by streamlining various processes such as clinical trial application and approval. Additional reforms will likely increase the number of Chinese hospitals and research centers able to manage clinical trials without having to undergo an extensive certification process.

These ICH-driven reforms will likely provide US pharmaceutical companies with greater opportunities to include China in global clinical research as well as greater access to the Chinese markets. As a member of ICH, China will be expected to continue implementing regulatory requirements for the manufacture and testing of study drug products. We expect to see an uptick in the conduct of clinical trials once the controls are in place to ensure that quality, safety, and efficiency is consistent across the Chinese markets.

We at Contracts Associates are looking forward to the further integration of China’s prominent researchers into our global clinical trials.